The subject of modification, especially when it comes to motorcycles, was once again brought up. In particular it deals with modifications that would not pass a Motor Vehicle Inspection System. It's on riders' minds again thanks to the recent DOTr memorandum that mandates vehicle inspection (prior to renewal of registration) at Private Motor Vehicle Inspection Centers (PMVICs) where available.

MC rights group: Modified motorcycles must be allowed at PMVICs image

Riders who first went to PMVICs to to renew their registration earlier this year when it was first mandated found that these private inspection centers automatically fail a motorcycle’s Vehicle Inspection Report (MVIR) on the grounds that some of its components are no longer “stock” or have already  been modified, either for performance gain, as replacement for worn parts or simply for looks.


Motorcycle Rights Organization (MRO) – a rider’s rights advocacy group – has sent its position letter to the DOTr to reiterate that the previous anti-modification rule of the LTO is still suspended until further notice. Hence, all PMVIC inspections on motorcycles should not turn away motorcycles simply open spotting modifications.

“Our plea, is to allow all vehicles to be inspected regardless of the parts being OEM/ stock, or aftermarket,” said Jobert Bolanos of MRO.

According to MRO, the PMVIC inspection guidelines set for motorcycles is based on the AHS-2008-01, and with it, section 7, states that prior approval from the LTO and DTI with regards to modifying parts or the standard design of a motorcycle is no longer necessary and is suspended.

What modifications are NOT allowed?

While most modifications done do little to change a motorcycle's safety and performance characteristics, there are still quite a few modifications that motorcycle riders commonly think are legal but NOT.

Some illegal modifications include: blinkers (these include blinking tail lights, blinking LED lights, etc.), red front/ headlight, excessive auxiliary lights, mufflers that emit more than 99 decibels (dB) of sound taken at 2,000 to 2,500 rpm, plate number covers and many more.

To know what are allowed and not allowed, read our full story here.